CPR for Dogs

Anyone who has been to a CPR class is familiar with the basics of mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. First you’ll check to be sure the patient has a clear airway, then check to see if the patient is breathing, check whether the patient has a heartbeat and, if the patient awakens during the process, be careful that you don’t get bitten by the patient.

The American Red Cross has been instructing people in CPR for pets for quite some time now and has classes that include all manner of first aid, including mouth-to-snout resuscitation. You read that correctly; mouth-to-snout.

The procedure is similar to traditional mouth-to-mouth resuscitation between humans, the chief difference being that the person performing the procedure will close the dog’s mouth and instead provide breaths into the dog’s nose. The process sounds humorous in theory, but it works and knowing how to perform mouth-to-snout resuscitation on your pet could literally save its life.

In addition to the mouth-to-snout procedure, dogs can have chest compressions performed in an emergency where the heart stops. Learning and knowing these techniques can save the life of a dog in distress and let him live to chase rabbits or play fetch another day.The concept of pet CPR is gaining much notoriety and is starting to be taught by organizations all over the country that formerly provided traditional CPR training and certification. If you’re interested in taking these classes yourself, contact your local Red Cross. The life you save may be your dog’s.

HOW TO GIVE YOU DOG CPR

Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, or CPR, as it is called, is a version of artificial respiration that includes assisting the HEART to BEAT. The purpose of CPR is to keep oxygen moving to the lungs and blood circulating throughout the body. The directions contained here APPLY TO DOGS. While these instructions may be good in an emergency, it is wise to check with your VET to establish the procedure that is best for your DOG.

How To Administer CPR

Dog CPRIf your DOG is NOT breathing use a finger to clear any mucus or other objects from the mouth. TILT the head back to straighten the airway passage.

Hold the mouth shut with one hand, and place yourDog CPR mouth over the DOG’S nose and mouth making sure the seal is tight.

Blow into the nose while watching to see if the chest expands.

If the chest DOES NOT EXPAND start over again by clearing the mouth. If the chest DOES EXPAND release your DOG’S mouth so it can exhale.

Repeat the breathing procedure once every five (5) seconds until your DOG is breathing normally, or until your Vet or other Emergency technician is available to begin treatment.

IF YOU CANNOT DETECT A HEARTBEAT YOU MUST PERFORM ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION IN CONJUNCTION WITH CARDIAC RESUSCITATION.

Dog CPRPUT your DOG on its right side. PUT the heel of your hand on the ribcage just behind the elbow. PUT your other hand on top of the first hand.

Firmly press on the ribcage in quick, smooth movements. Depending on the size of your DOG press down 3-4 inches using both hands. The compression should last no longer than 1/2 second. The smaller the DOG the fewer inches of compression and less force are needed. At all times try not to damage the ribcage.

Repeat this procedure a total of 10 times.

Then, if your DOG is not breathing, perform CPR as described above.

Alternate between the chest compressions (10 in a row), and one breath into the DOG’S nose.

GET YOUR DOG TO A VET!!!!!

The concept of pet CPR is gaining much notoriety and is starting to be taught by organizations all over the country that formerly provided traditional CPR training and certification.If you’re interested in taking these classes yourself, contact your local Red Cross.The life you save may be your dog’s.

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