Yesterday, the New Jersey SPCA charged Kisha Curtis, 28,  with two counts of abandonment and two counts of failure to provide proper sustenance to an animal.  Patrick was discovered March 16 by maintenance workers inside a garbage chute at the Garden Spires apartment building in Newark, NJ, a 550-unit complex notorious for drugs and other crimes.

She said she couldn’t take care of him anymore.  And she denied throwing him down the garbage chute.

Nice story, Kisha.

The four counts (two criminal counts and two civil counts) could result to up to six months in jail or a $1,000 fine and community service**.

That’s IT?  Cruelty like this doesn’t dictate maybe six months in jail, or maybe 1,000 dollar fine and community service.   This Kisha person needs to do more significant jail time – way more significant jail time.

Can we look at the picture of Patrick again?   Can someone, like, smack this Kisha person up side the head and say LOOK?

Ya really did a number on your dog, Kisha.  And fixing the result of your handiwork has fallen on a dedicated veterinary practice and thousands of animal lovers out there that have donated thousands of dollars.

Patrick is recovering at the Garden State Veterinary Group and has a Facebook, the Patrick Miracle.  You can also view other photos of Patrick at this Shutterfly account.

He is still being fed small meals and a foreign object was found in his stomach.  Once he gets stronger, exploratory surgery will be performed.  Garden State Veterinary Group has stopped taking donations towards Patrick’s care, but they encourage people to give to the animal rescue of their choice in Patrick’s name.  My choice will be the Associated Humane Societies and Popcorn Park Zoo.  They were the first to stabilize Patrick and get him on his way to recovery.

You’re a waste Kisha.  A complete waste.  You’re also a skank.  I’m viewing your Facebook right now.  From what I see, you fit right in with the garbage.   Seriously, your employer is Klimaxx Promo Girls?

Don’t ask me to link to THAT SITE!  Google it yourselves.  Hide the kids.

**In New Jersey it is a Disorderly Persons Offense.

4:22-17. Cruelty; disorderly persons offense

a. A person who shall:

(1) Overdrive, overload, drive when overloaded, overwork, deprive of necessary sustenance, abuse, or needlessly kill a living animal or creature;

(2) Cause or procure , by any direct or indirect means, including but not limited to through the use of another living animal or creature, any such acts to be done; or

(3) Inflict unnecessary cruelty upon a living animal or creature, by any direct or indirect means, including but not limited to through the use of another living animal or creature; or unnecessarily fail to provide a living animal or creature of which the person has charge either as an owner or otherwise with proper food, drink, shelter or protection from the weather ; or leave it unattended in a vehicle under inhumane conditions adverse to the health or welfare of the living animal or creature–

Shall be guilty of a disorderly persons offense, and notwithstanding the provisions of N.J.S.2C:43-3 to the contrary, for every such offense shall be fined not less than $250 nor more than $1,000, or be imprisoned for a term of not more than six months, or both, in the discretion of the court. A violator of this subsection shall also be subject to the provisions of subsection c. and, if appropriate, subsection d. of this section.

Subsection c. For a violation of subsection a. or b. of this section, in addition to imposing any other appropriate penalties established for a crime of the third degree , crime of the fourth degree, or disorderly persons offense, as the case may be, pursuant to Title 2C of the New Jersey Statutes, the court shall impose a term of community service of up to 30 days, and may direct that the term of community service be served in providing assistance to the New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, a district (county) society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, or any other recognized organization concerned with the prevention of cruelty to animals or the humane treatment and care of animals, or to a municipality’s animal control or animal population control program. The court also may require the violator to pay restitution or otherwise reimburse any costs for food, drink, shelter, or veterinary care or treatment, or other costs, incurred by any agency, entity, or organization investigating the violation, including but not limited to the New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, a district (county) society for the prevention of cruelty to animals, any other recognized organization concerned with the prevention of cruelty to animals or the humane treatment and care of animals, or a local or State governmental entity.

3/29/11 Update:  Charges Upgraded.


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