More states, counties, cities and municipalities are taking notice and showing awareness of animal welfare issues and Nevada is one of them.  This Thursday several new laws will be going into effect; one concerning tethering, another which will affect breeders and another targeting animal/dog fighting.  These are all good moves for our companion animals!

First we have a law that will limit chaining/tethering;

Based on Senate Bill 132, dogs can no longer be chained for more than 14 hours a day and they must have at least 12 feet of movement. A few exceptions are made for vets, dog shows and the like.

I still think 14 hours is too much but it’s a step in the right direction. Dogs are social animals and constant chaining has proven to be a major problem for than just one reason. Chained dogs tend to be undersocialized and become very territorial which makes them much more prone to aggression and biting.

“Dogs have hung themselves on short chains, died from extreme heat as they were unable to move out of the sun, died from extreme cold, even dehydration when their water evaporates,” Reno resident Karen Goodman, who proposed the law, said. “It’s all too easy to forget a dog who’s chained out of sight.”

Goodman said, “It’s unfortunate we have to legislate kindness and compassion to animals, but we do.”

For more information on dog chaining, check out DogsDeserveBetter.com.

A subsection of Assembly Bill 15 will address breeders; It will be illegal for breeders and retailers to separate puppies and kittens from their mothers earlier than eight weeks of age.

“I think the bill was targeted at those who would remove puppies at three and four weeks just for the money,” Mitch Schneider of Washoe County animal control said.

And Assembly Bill 199 will address animal fighting, specifically being in possession of a fighting animal. NV has been one of the few states which had no laws on the books against the possession of fighting animals and now that’s changed.

That’s now illegal and so is selling animals for use in fighting as well as participating in animal fights even as a spectator.

… he said, “If you happen to be at a dog fight and you have your dog there with you and you’re just watching, you’re going down for it, too.”

Little by little the perception of animals, their treatment and welfare is coming to the forefront. There’s still a long way to go but even a small step like these are steps in the right direction. Kudoes NV for getting on the right road and making some changes!

Be Sociable, Share!
Email This Post Email This Post

Like this post? Subscribe to my RSS feed and get loads more!